Brexit: Bacon-Munching Proud Gammons Defending Borders

What movie does Brexit remind me of?

There has been much fuss over the last few days concerning Brexit Secretary David Davis telling business leaders in Vienna that Brexit will not lead to a ‘Mad Max-style world’, in response to fears that the incumbent Conservative government will use it as an excuse to tear up workers’ rights.

From this, such bizarre references led to much response in terms of others, comparing it to other films, most notably LBC host James O’Brien dedicating much of his show to that subject. So on that subject, I feel the need to comment, both as a film buff and a Brexiteer. Which film does Brexit remind me of? That would be of course the 1997 cult classic Event Horizon.

Now while this may seem like a bizarre comparison, let’s examine the plot for the film:

The film concerns a space crew, led by Captain Miller and Dr. William Weir. They have been assigned to investigate the recently discovered space ship Event Horizon, which has been missing for the past 7 years. This is something very important, especially to the likes of Weir who was the main architect of the ship.

Once on board however, they discover that things are not what they seem. Various crew members start having hallucinations, others are possessed and injured and when finding out why the ship has been missing for so long via tapes discovered and then unscrambled (in that all members were violently attacked, tortured and murdered due to the ship having opened up the gates of hell through the ship’s dimensional gateway), the crew mostly decides to leave completely. That said, getting out is not so easy.

Weir becomes attached and then possessed as well, becoming the film’s antagonist, attacking and killing several crew members, all the while doing his best to make sure the remaining members join him in hell. At the end, Miller and Weir fight, and Miller is the eventual victor, blowing up that part of the ship with bombs planted along the ship’s corridors.

The remaining crew members supposedly escape on the remaining parts of the ship, but after one still has hallucinations of Weir, the audience is left unsure as to whether they have escaped or are still stuck upon the Event Horizon.

Now let’s recount the background of Brexit:

In 1973, Britain economically weak and in the midst of some of the worst social problems of the 20th century (to the point where three-day weeks had to be introduced), joined the Common Market, which replicated the idea of a united Europe, an idea lost thanks to two World Wars, among other issues with the various European countries. Once inside however, the British realise that things are not all they seem.

Mass immigration from the EU’s free movement of people hurt both social cohesion and general wages, endless regulation hurt small businesses and threatened sovereignty, unelected bureaucrats running the show moved it closer to something antidemocratic with the European Parliament being sitting ducks as they were unable to enact legislation themselves and upon finding out where the bloc was heading (becoming an international superstate, with a national anthem, a currency and an undemocratic top unaccountable to anyone) decided to put pressure on the government in order to leave it.

Various attempts did not work, partially because the political elites not wanting to and an idea failing to reach a wider audience yet. Then eventually, after failed referendums and various parties failed to break the ice on the issue, UKIP forced the elite’s hand and a new referendum was granted, leading to the majority of people voting to leave the European Union. At the end, we had voted to leave the EU, using the democratic processes of Britain, and then subsequently trigger Article 50 in early March 2017.

The United Kingdom are meant to be leaving, but after various agreements and policies (such as the idea of a ‘soft Brexit’ constantly floating around and a transition period down the line), it seems uncertain as to whether Britain will have left at all.

A frightening parallel, isn’t it? In both cases, we have something that is initially seen as a good thing or a thing worth exploring and then upon finding out that actually said thing will be very detrimental, the main characters in these situations try to leave but their will is undermined at nearly every point. From this, it can be seen that Event Horizon is the movie most akin to the situation surrounding Brexit.

It disgusts me that the Cabinet (full of former Remainers I might add) are doing their utmost to make sure that we are half in half out of the EU. That is not what most Leave voters voted for and it is about time the government understand this and follows on through with the will of the people.

This is just to point out how the handling of leaving the EU by both career politicians and unelected bureaucrats are such a farce that it can be compared to a rubbish late 90s horror film, let alone the Mad Max series as Davis had suggested.

Runners up in terms of films that can compare to Brexit include They Live! (whereby a group of alien elites do their hardest to keep their populace down, much like the EU and their bureaucrats and the various European governments that kneed to their every whim) and Sweet Smell Of Success (whereby corrupt journalists push out lies in order to smear those they don’t like, as in the leftwing press propagating Project Fear throughout the Brexit campaign and still do so know, as this Guardian article can attest to).

Those films I can recommend, especially the latter, a legitimate classic that examines corruption among the media and political class, and the collusions between the two. In other words, the corruption we beat in voting to leave the European Union. Hopefully the government will respect our will and enact such public feeling accordingly. Only time will tell.

(Articles reflect the views of the author, and not necessarily those of Luke Nash-Jones, The Red Pill Factory, or Make Britain Great Again.)

Most Popular

To Top